One Hundred Four
Very cute, and fun sci-fi. But the beginning of a series, and if you aren’t expecting that (like I wasn’t), you’ll be gravely disappointed by the cliffhanger ending. It’s a good ending for a non-ending, though. You know. 
——-
"Zane lives in a future in which everything is networked and  microchipped. His bedroom talks to him, reads his temperature, and  informs him when he will next need to go to the bathroom. His parents  are wired, too—both are network broadcasters with studios at  home—although Zane never sees them unless he makes an appointment. His  best pal is his dog, Hugo, who wears a microchip installed by the family  vet that allows him to talk when Zane wears a special earphone. But  Hugo tells Zane things he isn’t supposed to know—for example, that Dr.  Gristle has been performing twisted techno-experiments on an entire lab  full of animals, and that the boy is the only one who can rescue them.  Techno-savvy kids will chuckle at this goofily satirical look at how  adults use technology to keep their children "safe," and how that  technology can also turn around and—literally—bite them." - School Library Journal

One Hundred Four

Very cute, and fun sci-fi. But the beginning of a series, and if you aren’t expecting that (like I wasn’t), you’ll be gravely disappointed by the cliffhanger ending. It’s a good ending for a non-ending, though. You know.

——-

"Zane lives in a future in which everything is networked and microchipped. His bedroom talks to him, reads his temperature, and informs him when he will next need to go to the bathroom. His parents are wired, too—both are network broadcasters with studios at home—although Zane never sees them unless he makes an appointment. His best pal is his dog, Hugo, who wears a microchip installed by the family vet that allows him to talk when Zane wears a special earphone. But Hugo tells Zane things he isn’t supposed to know—for example, that Dr. Gristle has been performing twisted techno-experiments on an entire lab full of animals, and that the boy is the only one who can rescue them. Techno-savvy kids will chuckle at this goofily satirical look at how adults use technology to keep their children "safe," and how that technology can also turn around and—literally—bite them." - School Library Journal